Did You Know anyone in Africa can now access solar power?

YEAH….COS IT IS VERY POSSIBLE

Inventive Africa

Africa has long faced challenges that inhibit the continents chances of developing and reaching its potential. Among one of the greatest challenges is sufficient energy. Much of the worlds oil supply is sourced in Africa. Nigeria and Angola supply the world with huge amounts of barrels of oil a day. Despite this electricity is often unstable and unreliable. This effects everyone from industry to children in rural areas trying to do their homework.

In many countries, like Ghana, Nigeria and even Kenya, power outages are common place. Load shedding (planned power outages to save capacity) attempts to offer people a way of planning their lives around power outages, but fluctuations in power often cause electrical devices to fail and batteries to explode. Renewable energy is being lauded as the answer, but there are still challenges facing it. Storage capabilities still do not take into consideration peak times and night time usage of electricity, although

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SOLAR POWER FOR EVERYONE IN AFRICA!

Africa has long faced challenges that inhibit the continents chances of developing and reaching its potential. Among one of the greatest challenges is sufficient energy. Much of the worlds oil supply is sourced in Africa. Nigeria and Angola supply the world with a huge amount of barrels of oil a day. Despite this electricity is often unstable and unreliable. This effects everyone from industry to children in rural areas trying to do their homework.

In many countries, like Ghana, Nigeria and even Kenya, power outages are common place. Load shedding (planned power outages to save capacity) attempts to offer people a way of planning their lives around power outages, but fluctuations in power often cause electrical devices to fail and batteries to explode. Renewable energy is being lauded as the answer, but there are still challenges facing it. Storage capabilities still do not take into consideration peak times and night time usage of electricity, although storage innovations are offering hope. Increased storage capabilities will make a huge difference to on grid power, but with so much of the continent still not connected to the grid, off grid solutions are equally as important.

Why Should You Switch to Solar Energy

Within the period of not even an hour, the Sun amazingly provides more energy than the world uses in an entire year.

Isn’t this amazing to know that the whole mankind has this sort of luxury to have the blessing naturally?

The potentiality of solar energy is beyond our imagination. To be exact, the surface of earth absorbs 120000 Tera Watts of solar radiation which we call “sunlight” and this amount is amazingly 20000 times more than the amount energy needed on the earth in a year.

Again think about it for a minute, we are letting this huge amount of Solar energy to lose its way into nothing where scientists have already proven that the source is dying day by day. Yes, the Sun is dying a little in every moment! This phenomenon is a continuous process which will happen for the next couple of billion years, according to NASA.

Yes, I know what you are thinking at this specific moment. Unless and until you are a scientist or a Nature lover, you are saying,” Why should I care? I am not going to live billion years.” Well, for that question, the answer is quite simple. Just consider this information that you are the reason, why the amount of nonrenewable energy (Coal, Natural Gas, Oil, Uranium resources) is reducing day by day. Now there’s another one, Australia has 10% of worldwide retrievable organic coal which is sufficient for only 125 years more.

To support the point, one of the world’s largest energy storage company Tesla Motors has recently made a proposal to purchase Solarcity, leading Solar energy storage company in the world at this moment. Even the organizations like Tesla Motors are starting to realize the business scope in Solar energy and also keeping the earth a bit more resourceful at the same time. So, it is high time to switch to Solar energy and make a step forward towards a greener world.

Isn’t it bit worrying to you now? If not, let’s dig in a little deeper to find out what are the points you were missing till you read this write up.

You are an energy consumer and you are using the free product provided to you by mother-nature. Not entirely free actually, you are paying 4/5 times more bills than it actually requires by doing nothing to reduce the amount of energy consumption. According to cost comparison of energy sources 2016, it is prominent to say that the cost of KW-hr you are spending on nonrenewable energy is too high when you compare that to the Solar PV cost of KW-hr.

Yes, you are right. You need to see a quality energy rating consultant if you have not consulted to one till date, at least to cut the cost of your consumption and may be contribute to the planet earth a bit.

Turn Down the Heat: Climate Extremes, Regional Impacts, and the case of Resilience

  • This report, part II in a series, looks at likely impacts of 2°C and 4°C warming across three vulnerable regions.
  • It describes risks to agriculture and livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa, the rise in sea-level and devastation to coastal areas likely in South East Asia, and water extremes facing South Asia.
  • Turn Down the Heat warns that poor coastal urban communities are among the most vulnerable to climate change.

In the report Turn Down the Heat: Climate Extremes, Regional Impacts, and the Case for Resilience, launched in June 2013, scientists look at the likely impacts on three vulnerable regions if the world continues on its current trajectory and warms by 2 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial times by mid-century and continues to become 4°C warmer by 2100.

The report looks across Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia, revealing how rising global temperatures are increasingly threatening the health and livelihoods of their most vulnerable populations. It builds on the previous report in the series, Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C World Must Be Avoided, that concluded the world likely will warm by 4°C  by the end of the century.

The latest report in the series describes the risks to agriculture and food security in sub-Saharan Africa; rise in sea-level, bleaching of coral reefs, and devastation of coastal areas in South East Asia; and fluctuating rain patterns and food production impacts in South Asia. The report, prepared by the Potsdam Institute of Climate Research and Climate Analytics, synthesizes the current peer-reviewed literature and supplements it with computer modeling, finding that future impacts across the regions are potentially devastating.

How climate change will affect African Farmers

Desert

The World Bank’s recent report, Turn Down the Heat: Climate Extremes, Regional Impacts, and the Case for Resilience, underscores the urgency of supporting African farmers now so that they can better cope with the potential impacts of a changing climate.

Turn Down the Heat finds that an increase of 4 degrees Celsius worldwide would spell increased droughts, more frequent flooding, and shifts in rainfall in Africa, jeopardising the region’s food security and economic growth. Here are some of the report’s findings.

What changes should we expect to take hold if global temperatures rise?

– Rainfall patterns would shift: Around the 2080s, annual precipitation may decrease by up to 30% in southern Africa, while East Africa will see more rainfall.

– Heat extremes would occur more often: By the 2030s, when temperatures could be 1.5°C warmer, previously unprecedented heat extremes would cover one-fifth of the land areas in the southern hemisphere during the summer.

– Dry, arid regions would spread: Arid regions would expand by 10%, particularly in Southern Africa and parts of West Africa.

– Sea-level would rise: The sea-level is expected to rise by 50 cm by 2060, threatening important seaports such as Mombasa, Kenya.

What does this mean for African agriculture and food security?

– Farmers would see lower crop yields: Maize, wheat and sorghum are all sensitive to high temperatures. As heat extremes exceed these thresholds more often, these crop yields would diminish.

– Farmers would also lose arable land: As global average temperatures increase 1.5°C to 2°C by 2040, drought and aridity would contribute to African farmers’ losing 40 to 80% of their croplands used to grow maize, millet and sorghum.

– Less food would be available to eat: Warming patterns mean that per capita cereal production would be 10% lower in 2050 than in 2000. If we also consider the effect of food trade, potential food availability per person actually drops by 15%.

– Malnutrition would also increase: Without climate change and other policy interventions, the number of malnourished children in Africa will likely increase from 33 million to 42 million. Climate change could mean a further 10 million children suffer from malnutrition.

What can we do to help African farmers?
We already have many tools at our disposal to help farmers better manage the risks associated with a changing climate, as the report highlights. For example, we can promote the development and adoption of crops that can tolerate higher temperatures and drought conditions.

We can also improve energy access, which would enable countries to expand irrigation systems. Overall, it is critical to boost agricultural productivity now by facilitating investment in the sector and improving crop management techniques. Fortunately, we have a prime opportunity to make gains in this area as we look forward to the African Union Year of Agriculture in 2014.

Cheap solar cells made from perovskite promise 20% efficiency — Watts Up With That?

Major advance in solar cells made from cheap, easy-to-use perovskite Physicists boost efficiency of material that holds promise as base for next-generation solar cells UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA – BERKELEY Solar cells made from an inexpensive and increasingly popular material called perovskite can more efficiently turn sunlight into electricity using a new technique to sandwich […]

via Cheap solar cells made from perovskite promise 20% efficiency — Watts Up With That?

LET’S SAVE THE EARTH

let us care for earth

the land, sea and the ocean-
this very hour.

hydrokinetic
water power for current-
eco friendly tech.

use radiant light
to generate, to renew-
the solar shower

burning fossil fuel
increase carbondioxide-
global warming risk.

the greenhouse effect
makes life on earth possible-
energizing earth.

ultraviolet light
filter through ozone layer-
climatic changes.

we can save the earth
we can recycle, reuse-
set an example.

time to cool the earth
treat her for what she is worth
keep her clean and green.

WHO ARE THE GREATEST FOOD WASTERS? AND HOW DOES THIS AFFECT OUR ENVIRONMENT

The three biggest groups of people that waste food are;

-Young consumers (18-24).

-Households with an annual income of over #2, 000, 000.

-Families with children.

And how does this in turn environmentally affect us? When food rots with other organics, it releases a greenhouse Gas called Methane, which is 25 times more potent than the pollution that comes out of your car exhaust. These hidden facts are often unknown to the average Nigerian, thereforeit is common to not think twice about throwing out food that is still edible, disregarding the hunger factor within Nigeria. 

So what’s the hidden impact of this? The resources used to grow or manufacture the food. And about 20%-40% of foods are rejected for selling, not because they are inedible, but purely because they are not up to grocer’s standards of selling. These commonly unknown facts are all the hidden cause as to why it is so important that we educate ourselves on the environmental and economical impact of food wastage! Do something to help- spread the awareness. Buy one less bag of groceries per week, donate food you don’t think you will eat to your closest food drive. If you know of anyone struggling, rescue your food and your friend. They may not openly ask for help, but it is likely they will not reject the offer!